Bio

Over the past several years, she has displayed her work in various group shows through out the state of Vermont. 


Lorraine’s mixed media assemblages are a collection of “glimmering prizes”. Assembled in old boxes, frames and books found objects find unity and a common voice in her hands. Her assemblages not only speak to the sadness of lost and forgotten things but through Lorraine’s creative touch find life again.

Lorraine is a revealer of ghosts. Not the kind that clank down hallways in phosphorescent sheets or the ones who haunt graveyards by night; the ghosts she deals with are the essences, the aftereffects that are left behind, in and around the objects of our daily lives.

Whether it’s an old family photo or grandmother’s rocking chair, we’ve all felt the presence of someone long gone when we encounter their things - the imprint they leave behind after possessing an object for a long period of time. It may be just a fleeting memory, a faint electric impulse that jolts us into thinking, into feeling that person’s wordless presence, but it is there. The ghost of a person, left behind in the yellowed paper, the cracked leather, the worm-eaten wood…


When Lorraine walks through an antique market, she can sense them. She picks through piles, flips through postcards, rummages around bins to find those objects, those glimmering prizes that have retained enough of their previous owners to have that electricity, that spark of life. She then gathers them up, takes them home and begins to unveil their stories…

…A broken lock…


…Yellowing lace…


…A porcelain doll’s head.


These objects, these things once had owners. They were bought and sold, made and broken. Some of them were kept and treasured, while others were forgotten in attics. Each has a story to tell, whether it is in the voice of a young girl or the whisper of an old woman.

Lorraine’s gift is in sifting through these disparate objects, finding the compatible bits and pieces of others’ lives and weaving their faint and ancient energies together until they sing together in one voice. Her assemblages not only speak to the sadness of these lost and forgotten things, but they remind us that their owners have been lost and forgotten as well.


And if them, what of us?